Brave

Yet another Disney film that features a total of zero people of color.

The really awesome thing about Brave is that it is a movie that is dedicated to the growth of a mother-daughter relationship. At the end, I definitely felt like giving my ma a call and seeing how things were going. This intergenerational relationship is the center of the film, and it’s a nice deviation from finding a true love. The lack of romantic motivation is refreshing. 

Brave is really unique in a film in the sense that Merida is a princess that wants nothing to do with the realm of love. In an archery contest for her hand in marriage, Merida enters in disguise and then wins with triumph. But being a princess, her primary concerns were still princess-like (what to wear, feminine skill training, getting married, etc). Merida is a rebellious tomboy, which is a lot of fun, but she was shoved into the cookie-cutter role of a princess and it just isn’t a place that fits her. 

Merida is a warrior, like Mulan. She believes she is not burdened by gender roles nor should she have to adhere to them. Her mother, however, thought differently, and through a course of events, Merida’s mother, Elinor, is transformed into a bear. Instantly filled with regret, Merida discovers she must mend the tapestry of the family that she tore in a tantrum to break the spell before it comes permanent.

Now why would our brave (no pun intended) warrior have to save her people, herself, and her mother with a traditionally feminine skill? Was this just another part of being forced into the princess trope? Or did Merida overcome something that was difficult for her, as she was not that great at needlework to begin with (and the needlework completed by her is shabby anyway)?

Feminist rating: 10/10

Passes Bechdel Test

Fails Racial Bechdel Test

 

Disney’s Distortion of Awesome Princesses through Merchandise, Part 1

When you walk down the aisles of a toy store, it is fairly clear where boys and girls are expected to shop. Toy aisles are color-coded for an easy gender prescription. While most Disney princesses are the same old trope and conform easily into sexist merchandising, what happens to the princesses are a little more….untraditional? Turns out they are warped from their positions of individualism and power into the same cookie-cutter shape traditional princesses are in. Here are a few examples.

Merida

In case you missed it, when Disney released a makeover of their Princesses last May, quite a few people were upset with Merida’s makeover. Every body part — including her foot — were slimmed down. Her eyes got bigger and make up was applied. Her dress was lightened in color, made more feminine with golden etching and glitter. And, perhaps the worst offense of all, her weapon was removed from her grip.

Pocahontas

Pocahontas is one of the most problematic WoC in Disney. She is unfairly comandeered by white culture and morale with her tale with no respect for her ethnic background and Native American culture with preference to her tribe (essentially, her story woul be the same if she was replaced with a white woman). Still, Pocahontas persists as the strong princess that chose to stay with her people and her family rather than leave it all behind for the white boy she had met and had a fling with. Pocahontas’ merchandise is more damaging to Native American people than even her motion picture.

In the same makeover that had Disney fans stirring about the presentation of Merida as a Princess, Pocahontas was also redone.

You can see here that jewels were added to her buckskin getup. She was given earrings, her eyes got larger and more doe-like, her torso got thinner, and the necklace she got from her father was made shinier. Makeup was applied. She was all around glamourized with an appreance that looks like it belongs more on the Oscars’ red carpet rather than in the trees.

Disney’s marketing and merchandising strategy with Pocahontas also leads to cultural appropriation of Native American customs and way of life. This includes headdresses, Native American Halloween costumes, dream catchers, etc. Disney is literally cashing in on perpetuating racism.